The Design of a Weekly Review

The most important practice that I recommend everyone adopt for their personal productivity is a Weekly Review – a regular reflection on their priorities and goals designed to give them a sense of clarity for the upcoming week.

Whether you adopt the Getting Things Done method or something else isn’t important. It doesn’t matter whether you do it every single week at the same time, or only occasionally as needed. It can be more philosophical and introspective, or detailed and specific. It’s up to you.

But this brings up the question of design. How do you choose what kind of review you should perform? How do you perform it? What are the steps? How do you know when you’re done?

These are all process design questions, and very few people are prepared to take them on. But without this practice, you’re never going to level up your productivity. In the same way you can’t level up your finances without regularly reviewing your budget.

Learn more

This post is for
paying subscribers

Subscribe →

Or, login.

Read this next:

Praxis

PARA on Paper

How I adapted the PARA process and transformed my knowledge management

52 🔒 Jan 7, 2022 by Christina Luo

Praxis

P.A.R.A. Part 3 — How to build serendipity into your productivity system

Resurfacing Tiago’s in-depth P.A.R.A series

13 🔒 Aug 22, 2020 by Tiago Forte

Praxis

P.A.R.A — An Introduction

Resurfacing Tiago’s in-depth P.A.R.A series

57 🔒 Aug 8, 2020 by Tiago Forte

Praxis

Just-In-Time Project Management: A Digital-First Framework for Modern Projects

Technology has transformed every aspect of business, from the tools we use to communicate and collaborate, to how products and services are

3 🔒 May 7, 2018 by Tiago Forte

Praxis

Supersizing the Mind: The Science of Cognitive Extension

You enter your kitchen for a quick lunch: how is it exactly that your brain solves the problem “prepare lunch as efficiently as possible”? Y

0 🔒 Dec 19, 2017 by Tiago Forte

Thanks for reading Every!

Sign up for our daily email featuring the most interesting thinking (and thinkers) in tech.

Subscribe

Already a subscriber? Login